Traditional doesn’t equal boring

Making my lessons enjoyable isn’t my number one priority when teaching in the classroom. Or my number two. I’m not even sure it is third on the list. However, despite teaching in a fairly traditional and ‘boring’ way, I think it would be fair to say that most students I teach do enjoy the majority of their maths lessons.

I teach in a traditional and consistent style. Most of my lessons look the same- a starter or quiz lasting 10-15 minutes recapping a range of previous topics that have been covered so far in the year, an introduction or reintroduction as appropriate of the concepts being learnt and practised in the lesson, some modelling, independent practise (often in silence) with me circulating and discussing answers with students and identifying any common misconceptions, more modelling if required, and possibly a final question to check what students can do at the end of the lesson (note I write what they can do, not what they have learnt). The lessons feature lots of mini whiteboard work so that students can’t ‘opt-out of thinking’ and lots of questioning. I don’t use many of the ‘gimmicks’ or ‘hooks’ that some teachers choose to and I believe in the value of didatic teaching methods. I am unashamedly strict with my classes whilst simultaneously being warm with them. I rely on my personality and ‘humour’ (very much of the cringeworthy/dad variety) and try to inject a lot of energy and life into most of my lessons.

I am by no means perfect at any of this and, some days I am certainly not as good as I want to be. However, this is what I strive towards each lesson of each day.

I am not claiming this is a better or worse style of teaching than other methods (in terms of content learnt over time). My aim is to argue that this fairly traditional style of teaching isn’t ‘boring’ or ‘unenjoyable’ for students (though, even if it was I would still be inclined to teach this way as I do consider it to be the optimal method).

Some thoughts about why this is the case:

  • Progress– students enjoy making progress. They enjoy being able to do things they couldn’t previously do and gaining confidence as they begin to master their subject. Genuine and precise praise is clearly important for this, as is reminding them of how far they have come.
  • Relationships- these are one of the keys to to any teacher’s success. Building up strong relationships, getting ‘buy in’ and gaining the trust from students, whatever the teaching methods used will lead to students enjoying lessons, irrespective of the style of teaching used, whether ‘traditional’, ‘progressive’ or anything in between.
  • Enthusiasm– same as above- if a teacher is suitably enthusiastic, the style of teaching and the structure of lessons fades into insignificance. Students enjoy having enthusiastic teachers, however they teach.
  • Structure-having taught in both a ‘challenging’ inner city school in the UK and an extremely high performing international school, I believe that despite protestations that some students might make, almost all students prefer structure and clear boundaries (in my experience this is especially the case with boys but this is both a generalisation and purely anecdotal). A ‘traditional’ teaching style goes hand in hand with such an approach and provides students with an environment in which they can thrive.

Again, I am not arguing that jazzy lessons filled with group work, technology and discovery are worse than the approach to teaching I personally favour. Indeed, some traditional lessons certainly are boring- I know that sometimes mine are (to my discredit). Rather, I am claiming that ‘traditional’ style teaching can be just as enjoyable for students as any other method of teaching and ultimately, might even be more likely to lead to the most desirable form of enjoyment- the intrinsic enjoyment that comes with the challenge and mastery of a subject.

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